The Sod roofs in Norway have begun to reappear as an alternative to modern materials. For hundreds of years houses in Norway have been covered with turf. And they come in different varieties. Some are bright green and almost velvety. Others are golden and look like they’re growing wheat or oats. A number of turf roofs have flowers mixed in with the grass, and a few have small trees.  The advantages of turf roofs (also called sod roofs) are many. They are very heavy, so they help to stabilize the house; they provide good insulation; and they are long-lasting.

During the Viking and Middle Ages most houses had sod roofs. In rural areas sod roofs were almost universal until the beginning of the 18th century. Tile roofs, which appeared much earlier in towns and on rural manors, gradually superseded sod roofs.

But in recent times with the whole ‘Go Green’ movement, a new market has emerged with an ever increasing demand of mountain lodges and holiday homes. At the same time, open air museums and the preservation movement created a reservation for ancient building traditions. Since 2000, the board of the Scandinavian Green Roof Association has introduced a yearly award for the best green roof project in Scandinavia

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